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Review: The Discovery
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Review: The Discovery

24 Apr Posted by in Reviews | Comments
Review: The Discovery

The Discovery by Dan Walsh
Reviewed by Elizabeth Olmedo
Genre: Romance
Publisher: Revell
Publication Date: April 2012

The Discovery by Dan WalshThe world knows Gerard Warner as a renowned, spy novelist. Michael knows him as his grandfather and hero. An aspiring author himself, when he inherits his grandfather’s estate, Michael is anxious to follow in his footsteps. He decides that there is no better place to achieve his goal than in the very office where his grandfather wrote all of his bestselling novels.

Discovering an old, unpublished manuscript hidden inside a typewriter case, Michael is drawn into a suspenseful narrative with Nazi spies, danger, and conspiracies. However, unlike the rest of Gerard Warner’s novels, it is also a love story. Through the main characters, Ben and Claire, Michael will embark on a journey that not only will open up the doors to another era, but also reveal a whole new side to his grandfather.

In The Discovery, Dan Walsh resurrects the true meaning of love. Jumping between two time periods, the reader follows two fascinating stories as the author shows that love is a willingness to sacrifice, give, and put another’s needs before your own. Though predominantly a romance, a layer of suspense keeps the novel moving at a comfortable pace.

The story within the story is laced with lots of good characters — sometimes too good. In spite of taking place during War World II, a time in history when the government had everyone paranoid about German spies and attacks, I was surprised at how trusting so many of the characters were. I actually liked that. They held on to values such as loyalty and love-thy-neighbor that are often so scarce even in today’s society.

Real events intertwined with fiction provided the novel with a feel of realism, often making it hard to distinguish between the two. I enjoyed how Walsh made me care enough about those events to look them up once I’d finished the book. I recommend The Discovery to anyone looking for a nice, feel-good read with wholesome virtues.

Rating: G

Review copy provided by publisher.

 


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