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Review: Wounded Warrior, Wounded Home: Hope and Healing for Families Living with PTSD and TBI
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Review: Wounded Warrior, Wounded Home: Hope and Healing for Families Living with PTSD and TBI

20 Mar Posted by in Reviews | Comments
Review: Wounded Warrior, Wounded Home: Hope and Healing for Families Living with PTSD and TBI

Reviewed by: Elizabeth Olmedo
Genre: Non-Fiction
Publisher: Revell
Publication Date: March 2013

Facing some of life’s toughest situations should never be done alone. For that reason, Marshele Waddell and Kelly K. Orr have come together to write a book about combat-related PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury). We all know of the brave men and women who sacrifice so much for their country, but we often forget those who stand behind them.

When a wounded warrior returns home, his/her family and community also experience the effects of the war. As Waddell reminds readers, not all battle scars are visible to the naked eye. When a veteran struggles with PTSD and TBI, his/her life is altered as well as the loved ones’. The dynamics, to which they were once accustomed, have changed forever. They must learn and adapt to a new normal.

Wounded Warrior, Wounded Home is a powerful, heart-wrenching, and eye-opening read. It addresses extremely difficult situations that I can’t even fathom, and yet there are many people out there facing them every day. However, Waddell and Orr let their readers know that there is hope, and they are not alone in their home-front battle.

Each chapter concludes with a series of questions that allow the readers to reflect, consider, and analyze their personal circumstances. The book also offers guides and tips that veterans and those in their support network can use to develop a plan toward their own physical, emotional, and spiritual healing.

In Wounded Warrior, Wounded Home, the authors also included testimonies and accounts of others who have a loved one suffering with PTSD and TBI. This strengthened one of their main premises, “You are not alone.” It opened a window into the lives of military families also confronting these challenges.

I strongly recommend this book to service members, veterans, their families, and anyone who wishes to better understand those who give so much (be it on the battlefield or on the home front). Be prepared though, this is not a light read.

Rated PG-13: While there is nothing inappropriate in the book, it deals with heavy topics that might not be the most suitable for young readers.

Review copy provided by the publisher. Thank you!

 


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